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Pig farming is considered an integral part of life amongst the tribal population in Jharkhand, and many households practice backyard piggery with one or two pigs. Bahamani Purty, 45, lives in Otongora village, in Khunti, Jharkhand with her husband Marshall, and had been rearing pigs for a few years. In 2019, while attending a gram sabha meeting, Purty learnt that pig rearing was being promoted as an intervention under Axis Bank Foundation’s Sustainable Livelihoods Programme.
Paulina Mundu, a 40-year-old farmer in Khunti, Jharkhand, fulfilled her childhood dream of farming upon returning home. However, water scarcity posed a challenge, leading her to construct a farm pond under MGNREGA in 2017. Despite initial limitations, assistance from Axis Bank Foundation and WOTR in 2019 enabled Paulina to expand and improve the pond, enhancing irrigation capacity.
Located in a rain-fed area with limited water availability, residents say farming in Bhaironkonda has become particularly precarious in the last few years, owing to changing climatic conditions, and increasing costs of agriculture. Distressed, and desperate for solutions, some farmers started participating in Farmer Field Schools (FFS) organised by WOTR in 2019, as part of Axis Bank Foundation’s Sustainable Livelihoods Programme.
A large majority of the families in Narayanpet, Telangana are either wage labourers or small and marginal farmers who own less than 1Ha. of land. They have meagre incomes, limited access to resources, and no additional skill or financial support available to generate an alternate income. Keeping these factors in mind, the families were given support with backyard poultry farming.
Paddy is the staple food for the majority of Narayanpet’s population and is grown in these parts extensively. Its cultivation has always been traditional, with farmers flooding the fields to grow it. Given the severe land and water constraints, WOTR decided to promote System of Rice Intensification (SRI) and System of Crop Intensification (SCI) amongst farmers under Axis Bank Foundation’s Sustainable Livelihoods Programme.
Singaram Budhundu, 58, is a marginal farmer who lives with his family of 8 in Chinnajetram village in Narayanpet, Telangana. He owns 2 acres of land, where he grows rice and red gram. Within a small place, Budhundu and his family members manage a small kitchen garden and grow vegetables like red chillies, brinjal, tomatoes, okra and cauliflower using water from the household tap.
Water is essential for life and a cornerstone of sustainable development. Climate change, population growth, increasing urbanisation, and unsustainable practices are placing unprecedented strain on global water resources. Achieving water security – the ability to ensure sufficient, safe and accessible water for everyone’s needs – has become a pressing challenge in the 21st century.
In many parts of rural India, patriarchal norms and social stigma confine women to the default role of a homemaker. HSBC’s ‘Promoting Entrepreneurship, Employment Opportunities, and Increased Incomes in Maharashtra’ programme, changed the lives of 1,700 women across 20 villages in Karjat and Shrigonda in Maharashtra, empowering them to become entrepreneurs. Defying tradition, these women today are building successful businesses and transforming their communities.

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Pig farming is considered an integral part of life amongst the tribal population in Jharkhand, and many households practice backyard piggery with one or two pigs. Bahamani Purty, 45, lives in Otongora village, in Khunti, Jharkhand with her husband Marshall, and had been rearing pigs for a few years. In 2019, while attending a gram sabha meeting, Purty learnt that pig rearing was being promoted as an intervention under Axis Bank Foundation’s Sustainable Livelihoods Programme.
Paulina Mundu, a 40-year-old farmer in Khunti, Jharkhand, fulfilled her childhood dream of farming upon returning home. However, water scarcity posed a challenge, leading her to construct a farm pond under MGNREGA in 2017. Despite initial limitations, assistance from Axis Bank Foundation and WOTR in 2019 enabled Paulina to expand and improve the pond, enhancing irrigation capacity.
Located in a rain-fed area with limited water availability, residents say farming in Bhaironkonda has become particularly precarious in the last few years, owing to changing climatic conditions, and increasing costs of agriculture. Distressed, and desperate for solutions, some farmers started participating in Farmer Field Schools (FFS) organised by WOTR in 2019, as part of Axis Bank Foundation’s Sustainable Livelihoods Programme.
A large majority of the families in Narayanpet, Telangana are either wage labourers or small and marginal farmers who own less than 1Ha. of land. They have meagre incomes, limited access to resources, and no additional skill or financial support available to generate an alternate income. Keeping these factors in mind, the families were given support with backyard poultry farming.
Paddy is the staple food for the majority of Narayanpet’s population and is grown in these parts extensively. Its cultivation has always been traditional, with farmers flooding the fields to grow it. Given the severe land and water constraints, WOTR decided to promote System of Rice Intensification (SRI) and System of Crop Intensification (SCI) amongst farmers under Axis Bank Foundation’s Sustainable Livelihoods Programme.
Singaram Budhundu, 58, is a marginal farmer who lives with his family of 8 in Chinnajetram village in Narayanpet, Telangana. He owns 2 acres of land, where he grows rice and red gram. Within a small place, Budhundu and his family members manage a small kitchen garden and grow vegetables like red chillies, brinjal, tomatoes, okra and cauliflower using water from the household tap.
Water is essential for life and a cornerstone of sustainable development. Climate change, population growth, increasing urbanisation, and unsustainable practices are placing unprecedented strain on global water resources. Achieving water security – the ability to ensure sufficient, safe and accessible water for everyone’s needs – has become a pressing challenge in the 21st century.
In many parts of rural India, patriarchal norms and social stigma confine women to the default role of a homemaker. HSBC’s ‘Promoting Entrepreneurship, Employment Opportunities, and Increased Incomes in Maharashtra’ programme, changed the lives of 1,700 women across 20 villages in Karjat and Shrigonda in Maharashtra, empowering them to become entrepreneurs. Defying tradition, these women today are building successful businesses and transforming their communities.