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Rajesh Mahto, 40, is always looking for money he can save or money he can make. Until 2019, Mahto used to ride an autorickshaw. Having all but quit agriculture, the 2019 lockdown imposed due to Covid-19 forced Mahto to give farming a second shot. He was aided in his efforts by WOTR which provided seeds, irrigation inputs, and advice on farming, through Axis Bank Foundation’s Sustainable Livelihoods Programme.
Narendra Adhikari, 58, is not afraid of experimentation. Agriculture fascinates him, and he says he is always looking to learn new approaches to growing food. His 1 acre vegetable garden – where Adhikari presently grows at least 25-30 varieties of herbs, fruits and vegetables – is a testament to this approach. Around 2019, he came in touch with WOTR, and started attending training sessions and going on exposure visits held by the organisation, under Axis Bank’s Sustainable Livelihoods Programme.
Pig farming is considered an integral part of life amongst the tribal population in Jharkhand, and many households practice backyard piggery with one or two pigs. Bahamani Purty, 45, lives in Otongora village, in Khunti, Jharkhand with her husband Marshall, and had been rearing pigs for a few years. In 2019, while attending a gram sabha meeting, Purty learnt that pig rearing was being promoted as an intervention under Axis Bank Foundation’s Sustainable Livelihoods Programme.